Sunday, October 19, 2014

Centuries

From a New York Times piece on that Klinghoffer blood opera:-

Mr. Adams and Ms. Goodman have been accused of being insensitive, anti-Israel and even anti-Semitic in a work that gives a voice (often a beautiful one) to terrorists and suggests an explanation (though not an excuse) for their actions in the vexed history of the Palestinian people through centuries.

"Centuries"? 

Even a biased pro-Pal. book can only claim

Palestinians struggled to create themselves as a people from the first revolt of the Arabs in Palestine in 1834

^

Is This The Correct Way to Hold a Firebomb?




Caption:

Throwing an incendiary bottle at a car of the Israeli police in Jerusalem quarter of Silwan.

^

Saturday, October 18, 2014

They Are Telling Us Something (UPDATED)

"Herd" remark below

This 

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas suggested Jews should be banned from a holy site revered by both Jews and Muslims 


and this

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas called on Friday for the defense of the Al-Aqsa Mosque against Israel. Abbas stated that the holy site was being desecrated by settlers and that a continued Palestinian presence is required there to protect it...Palestinians "must be present at the Al-Aqsa Mosque," he said. "We must stop them (the settlers) from entering by any means possible. This is our mosque and they have no right to enter it and defile it."

The Palestinian president called for actions to replace words in regards to Jerusalem. "Al Quds," said Abbas, referring to Jerusalem by its Arabic name, "has a special place in the heart of every Palestinian, of every Arab, be they Muslim or Christian, Al Quds is the jewel in the crown and the eternal capital of the Palestinian people, and without which there will be no state."


came after this

RAMALLAH, October 8, 2014 (WAFA) – President Mahmoud Abbas on Wednesday warned the Israeli government of the repercussions of its actions which could turn the current political conflict into a religious one, stressing that the Palestinian people will not accept the latest Israeli measures taken against al-Aqsa Mosque.
“We all realize, and also the world realizes, the seriousness of using religion in political conflicts and transforming them into religious ones,” said Abbas in a press statement...“Every day, we see those [Jewish extremists] attempting to enter al-Aqsa by all means so as to compel [us] to accept what they want as a de facto status; to impose the temporal and spatial division of the Mosque, under the pretext that it has [rights] in it.”

and this:-

NABLUS, October 15, 2014 (WAFA) – ...Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah urged the international community to protect the Palestinian people...He called on the international community and the world countries to uphold their responsibilities and act against the daily violations committed against the holy sites, particularly al-Aqsa Mosque, stressing that the right to worship is a sacred right.

and this was reported a day after:-


JERUSALEM (Ma'an) -- An official said Saturday that if any power besides the Palestinian Authority ended up in control of East Jerusalem's Al-Aqsa Mosque, the Palestinian national project would be "destroyed."  Mahmoud al-Habbash, the Minister of Religious Affairs, told Ma'an that the PA needed to redouble its efforts to assert control in East Jerusalem.  "We should start working with the Jerusalem district ... and all the people of Jerusalem to bring back the weight of the PA in Jerusalem," al-Habbash said.  He said a "religious war" would erupt in the area if Israel continued carrying out its plans in Jerusalem.  "For Palestine, it is an open battle; even if Israel imposes a new reality in Jerusalem we will not give it legitimacy."   

I guess they are trying to tell us something. 

And that 'something' is that they are denying the Jewish people's historical, legal, religious and cultural connection to Jerusalem, to Mt. Moriah, the two Temples that existed there and the human rights of Jews to respect and honor their holy sites.

UPDATED


RAMALLAH, West Bank (AP) — The Palestinian president says his people should guard a Jerusalem holy site revered by both Jews and Muslims against visiting Jews, who he referred to as a "herd of cattle."
Mahmoud Abbas' fiery rhetoric Saturday follows comments he made the previous day that Jews should be banned from visiting the site, known to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary.

and the Yesha communities are a "cancer"


Hamas gets involved.

And now this:-




Dept'y Foreign Minister responds.

Graphic Zionism:



^

Kerry, ISIL, Israel

"As I went around and met with people in the course of our discussions about the ISIL coalition, the truth is we – there wasn’t a leader I met with in the region who didn’t raise with me spontaneously the need to try to get peace between Israel and the Palestinians, because it was a cause of recruitment and of street anger and agitation that they felt – and I see a lot of heads nodding – they had to respond to. And people need to understand the connection of that. And it has something to do with humiliation and denial and absence of dignity, and Eid celebrates the opposite of all of that." 

That was from Secretary of State John Kerry's 

Remarks at a Reception in Honor of Eid al-Adha at the Delegates Lounge in Washington, DC on October 16, 2014 

and now we have this from a State Dept. press conference from Marie Harf
Deputy Spokesperson, on October 17, 2014:

QUESTION: To the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? I’d like to come back to, return to the remarks Secretary Kerry made yesterday. He said that it’s imperative to re-launch the peace process, something he did in Cairo two, three days ago. But I think, for the first time, he made the connection, a link between the conflict and the rise of extremism and the rise of ISIL. And this morning the Israeli officials are pretty upset and angered against the Secretary.

So I would like to know if the Secretary --

MS. HARF: Well, yeah.

QUESTION: -- went a little bit too far.

MS. HARF: A couple comments. First, he did not make any linkage between Israel and the growth of ISIL, period. And we can go back over what he actually said, which I have in front of me. He did not make that linkage. What he was saying is in the course of his work, do leaders in Europe and in the Middle East tell him that they like that the U.S. wants to try to achieve peace? Of course they do. Do the leaders think peace would help create a more stable region? Of course they do. That is in no way a news flash. It’s something that presidents of both parties for decades have said, that if we could make progress on Middle East peace, that would help create a more stable region, and the Secretary was agreeing with what has been said publicly.

And I would take issue with the part of your question that Israeli leaders, plural, have disagreed with what they thought the Secretary said. I saw one in particular. And we would say to that that we know passions run high, politics are intense, but either this specific minister did not actually read what the Secretary said, or someone is engaging in the politics of distortion here. By any means it is an inaccurate reading of what the Secretary said. He did not make a linkage between Israel and the growth of ISIL, period.

And there's a follow-up"-

QUESTION: So you think that those leaders that told the Secretary of State there is a linkage, in fact, they’re expressing a sentiment of hate toward --MS. HARF: Well, that’s not what he was saying. He was saying that as he travels around the world --QUESTION: I understand.MS. HARF: Well, can I finish my sentence, Said?QUESTION: He was saying that that’s what – oh, sure.MS. HARF: And then you can follow up. Thank you.QUESTION: Sorry.MS. HARF: That as he travels around the world building a global coalition to defeat ISIL, which is an avowed enemy of Israel – the Secretary, helping to put together this coalition to defeat an enemy that has said they’re an avowed enemy of Israel, that he hears from people in conversations, as we have for many years, that if we could resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, that would help create a more stable region. In no way was he directly linking Israel and the growth of ISIL, at all.QUESTION: But you know, this is a story that goes way back. And I remember in the ‘70s, let’s say, with your close allies, the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, its foreign minister, or the king at the time, King Faisal, was always saying that not resolving this issue may lead to extremism or people will exploit it, as you said.MS. HARF: Absolutely, and American presidents --QUESTION: So there is a connection.MS. HARF: Well, American presidents and secretaries of state of both parties have said that if we can achieve peace between Israelis and Palestinians, it would be a blow to the region’s extremists. Yes, they’ve said that. But in terms of this specific Israeli minister’s comments, I think, and I think the Secretary thinks, and everyone thinks that what you say actually matters and not just how someone tries to distort it for their own political purposes....QUESTION: Yeah, sorry. Has the Secretary talked to Prime Minister Netanyahu since these comments and the flap?MS. HARF: I can double check.QUESTION: Thank you.MS. HARF: They talk frequently. I will check.

What do you think?

____________

What Khaled Abu-Toameh thinks.  Zero.

Friday, October 17, 2014

Shiloh.... West ______

So, you presumed that my title ended as:


West Bank

right?

Nope.








Don't be prejudicial.

That's in Montana.

^

The Jewish Homeland and the Elgin Marbles

Julian Ku writes that Amal Alamuddin-Clooney visited Greece as part of a legal team working for the return of the Elgin Marbles to Greece from Britain. He doubts 

"the strength of their legal case for the return of the Marbles.  At the time the Marbles were removed from Greece, the Ottoman Empire had sovereignty over Greece and there is pretty decent historical evidence that Lord Elgin had their authorization to remove the Marbles, or if he did not have authorization, his removal was ratified by official acts of the Ottoman government...there are strong moral arguments for the return of the Marbles to Greece. But...I think they have a very tough case...

One academic article explains the case for England keeping the Marbles so:-

In the early nineteenth century, a British Lord removed much of the sculpture from the Parthenon...The Greeks wish to see the Marbles returned to the Acropolis...Rejecting the emotional appeal of the Greek position, Professor Merryman analyzes the controversy...on reasoned, principled grounds. He concludes that the Greeks do not have a legal claim to the Marbles...He rejects cultural nationalism as a basis for the disposition of the Marbles, because cultural nationalism expresses dubious values and is founded on sentiment...Under the general principle of repose, the Elgin Marbles should remain in the British Museum until the Greek government can offer more compelling reasons for their return.

Mrs. Clooney 


thinks otherwise.

Be that as it may, the Ottomans had something much more precious: the historic national homeland of the  Jews.  Not cultural nationalism was involved but a nationalism over 3000-yars old expressed in political, religious, cultural, archaeological and a variety of other experiences, customs and practices all recognized by the supreme institution of international law in 1922, the League of Nations.  And not by just one "colonial power" who declared in 1917 that that should be a nobel aim but that League of Nations' decision had followed upon an earlier one - the decision of the allies who defeated the Ottoman Empire to affirm the right of the Jews to their homeland at San Remo in 1920, to wit:

The High Contracting Parties agree to entrust...the administration of Palestine, within such boundaries as may be determined by the Principal Allied Powers, to a Mandatory, to be selected by the said Powers. The Mandatory will be responsible for putting into effect the declaration originally made on November 8, 1917, by the British Government, and adopted by the other Allied Powers, in favour of the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, it being clearly understood that nothing shall be done which may prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine, or the rights and political status enjoyed by Jews in any other country.

I would think that those persons claiming a right of 'return' to a country that never existed, a land that had no specific boundaries and no form of administration, surely have even less a case that could be made than Greece does.

The Land of Israel is real property not just cultural property.  And our towns, hills, valleys, rivers and fields are worth much more than those friezes and sculptures.

^

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Pay Attention to Doorposts

This holiday of Sh'mimi Atzeret we had as guests at our table for lunch members of the Mageni family of Hevron.  The late Haim Mageni was one of Israel's foremost guides especially in the field of the Jewish presence in the areas of Judea and Samaria.  Our first Succot and Pesach as olim were spent with the Magenis in the Government Complex in Hebron in 1970-1971.

One of Haim's tours throught the alleyways of downtown Hebron was marked by pointing out the places where mezuzot used to be placed in the doorposts, signifying homes where Jews formerly lived.

And now I see this article:

Enter and be Welcome: Doorways in the Old City of Bethlehem, PalestineShadi Sami Ghadban, Shireen Fares Sahouri
From: Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology and Heritage Studies
Volume 2, Number 3, 2014
pp. 165-187 |

Abstract

The contribution of doorways to our understanding of the history and function of a building and its historical context cannot be overstated. For this study, the doorways of Bethlehem were examined. This city has played an important role in the history of Palestine and has the distinction of being the birthplace of Jesus. The identification and protection of its unique doorways is imperative to preserving its cultural identity and historical authenticity. Consequently, the main objective here was to study the Old City of Bethlehem; document and analyze the condition, form, types, and characteristics of its doorways; and assess their value as historic forms that might be considered within a process of safeguarding and adapted use.

^

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

The Miffed Minister

A Jordanian Minister is miffed:


Jordan will act promptly against Israeli violations

and the details:




Jordan affirmed that it will take prompt action against any Israeli escalation against the holy place in occupied Jerusalem, Minister of State for Media Affairs and Communications Mohammed Al Momani said.

Momani, who is also the government spokesman, affirmed that the "Jordan will take the needed political and legal measures to end the seizure against Al Aqsa Mosque and push Israel to commit to the peace agreement."...Further, the minister condemned the ongoing Israeli aggressions against Arab Jeruselmites and the Al Aqsa Mosque. "These aggressions constitute a flagrant violation against Jordan and a breach of heavenly religions and international norms," the minister affirmed.

The spokesman deplored the Israeli occupation forces' attacks against worshippers, mostly elderly people, at the Al Aqsa Mosque, and their action of arresting some of them. Momani also denounced the storming of the Al Aqsa Mosque's yards earlier today and use of force to vacate the mosque of the worshippers to allow settlers to break into the holy place.

The sources added that the Israeli Police allowed Jewish settlers to enter the courtyards of the mosque, accompanied by Deputy Speaker of the Israeli Knesset Moshe Feiglin. They forced their way into the mosque under the protection of the police, triggering violent clashes with the worshippers.

But what does the peace agreement obligate the sides?

Here, allow me to repeat:

ARTICLE 9

PLACES OF HISTORICAL AND RELIGIOUS SIGNIFICANCE

Each party will provide freedom of access to places of religious and historical significance.

...The Parties will act together to promote interfaith relations among the three monotheistic religions, with the aim of working towards religious understanding, moral commitment, freedom of religious worship, and tolerance and peace.

Minister Momani is the one not fulfilling the terms of the peace treaty.

Now I'm miffed.

_______________

UPDATE

Seven-minute edited Islamist clip of their violence.

And now this;

...the settlers are seeking to impose a new reality in the Al Aqsa Mosque aims to divide the mosque temporally and spatially, including threatening the Arab and Islamic identity of the mosque and the holy city.

^

How Bad is Ha-Ha-Haaretz, You Ask?

How bad, you ask?

Very bad.

For example, here's a snap of the English edition from October 7 (story text here):


What interested me was the caption:


"Traitor"?

The Hebrew word in the photograph is an abbreviation as notated by the double apostrophe and it is the abbreviation for "High Court of Justice", Beit HaDin HaGavoah L'Tzedek, pronounced Bagatz - bet, gimmel, tzaddi.

The story is about the Court's decision, after all:

Interior Minister Gideon Sa’ar said Monday he would not accept the High Court of Justice’s overturning of legislation that allowed asylum seekers who entered Israel illegally to be incarcerated without trial for up to a year.  He also criticized a second component of the court’s overturning of an amendment to the Prevention of Infiltration Law: the closure of the Holot detention facility in the south.

That word, Bagatz, is heard maybe a half-dozen times in Israel over the radio every week and sometimes in conversations.  It appears in all the newspapers. You hear it every week on the television, too.  You really need to be special to make an error like that.

I think it also hilarious that the story's second headline is about a translator denied to an assylum-seeker. If anyone requires a translator, its the English edition of Ha-Ha-Haretz.

But, on second thought, it seems that the editors, reporters and caption-writers are so ideologically perverted in their world-view that it probably never occured to anyone of responsibility to re-read that or perhaps they did and the text so fit into their political outlook that no one could even perceive the mistake, or maybe they think they commit no errors.

That's how bad a newspaper HaAretz is.

And the Ha-Ha is on its readers, but reflects on all who love israel and are ill-served by that broadsheet.


This is dedicated to my friend RA.
^

American Values From Basketball to Holiday Greetings

I read this and asked myself: were Jewish Israelis resident in Judea and Samaria invited to participate?

Hoop dreams: Susan Rice plays ball with Israelis and Palestinians
...last week in an unlikely venue: the basketball court on the Southern Lawn of the White House. That’s where U.S. National Security Advisor Susan Rice spent Thursday morning dribbling and dunking, along with 30 young Israelis and Palestinians — all basketball coaches for children’s teams in Israel and the West Bank.

Rice, who played basketball in high school, wrote on the White House blog: “I had the pleasure and honor to take a few minutes away from my desk and the Situation Room to play basketball with some remarkable young Israelis and Palestinians that have come together through sports to build bridges between their divided communities.”

Rice left the West Wing and changed into sports gear to spend time with the coaches.

...The Israelis and Palestinians came to the United States in the framework of PeacePlayers International, an international nonprofit organization founded in 2001 on the premise that “children who play together can learn to live together.”  The Israeli-Palestinian exchange program was funded by a State Department sports diplomacy program together with PPI, which builds reconciliation and understanding between communities in conflict. The visit is part of a longer two-year process the group is running in cooperation with the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv and the U.S. Consulate in Jerusalem.

As for PPI, I checked and was pleasantly surprised to find one of my favorite terms - "communities":-

PPI - ME works with ethnically and religiously diverse populations, including Ethiopian and Russian immigrants, and is committed to fostering gender equality through sport in both Jewish and Arab communities

Yes, I know that meant there social/ethnic groups of people rather than villages, towns and neighborhoods.

I asked the PPI office if any Israeli participant was a resident of one of the Yesha communities but so far, no response (holiday period).  The Consulate does its own sponsoring which is restricted to Arabs only.

By the way, even holiday greetings to Jews from the Consul-General is limited to Jerusalemites


Statement by Consul General Michael A. Ratney on the Occasion of the Jewish High Holidays:-
"I want to extend my warmest wishes as our Jewish friends and neighbors here in the Holy City of Jerusalem begin the High Holidays..."

What did Netanyahu say about "American values"?

Clever Use of the Term "Retreat"

Into your subconscious via SanghaSeva


Offering "Meditation in Action" retreats in India, UK and Israel-Palestine.
An active exploration of all of life; our retreats integrate meditation, observation and reflection with participation in positive actions for the benefit of others and the world.

These retreats can be fruitful and transformative, not least because they challenge our edges.
Yet we find the very skills that help us to connect and stay steady with ourselves in contemplation, allows us to be more fully with who and what we meet. Equally as we become more intimate with others we can find new depths of intimacy with ourselves.

In this kind of retreat we are called to explore our balance of being and doing; to investigate what really is helping and to expand our boundaries, to widen our circle of friends and what in life we can let into our hearts.  In this way we feel we are offering a continuation of the deepening of meditation, contemplation or spirit; of being open, in life, to life, in all its joys and sorrows.

^


Monday, October 13, 2014

Devious New York Times' Reporting

The New York Times' Jodi Ruderon reports on the Temple Mount today after the UN's Ban Ki-Moon made a provocative statement.

Here it is:

"while rebuilding is important, we must tackle the root causes of instability," Ban said.  "We must give renewed attention to the West Bank.  "I once again strongly condemn the continued settlement activity by Israel," the UN chief said...'I am also deeply concerned by repeated provocations at the holy sites in Jerusalem. These only inflame tensions and must stop," Ban said.
That is provocative because the root causes existed before 1967 and before 1947 for that matter and they are not connected to "West Bank settlements" or "Israel's occupation".

But there is something good in those words in that they prove to PM Netanyahu that no matter how much he does not want to "initiate a religious war", it is with us and has been for decades.  Ignoring it won't make it go away.

Last February we read this


“The policy of the government of Israel has been and continues to be the maintenance of the status quo at the Temple Mount, including freedom of access for all faiths to the holy sites,” Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s spokesman, Mark Regev, told The Jerusalem Post. “The government has no intention of changing this policy.”

Two years ago in May, we read this, however:

 "I have doubts, to put it mildly, that if we deposit the Temple Mount with foreign forces, we will not [?] very quickly slip into a religious sectarian war," he said. "Only under Israeli sovereignty, the accessibility and freedom of worship for all religions is a certainty, and will remain a certainty. Only under Israel are peace and quiet maintained."
That claim is not at all a certainity.

More recently, Netanyahu added something and announced to the Hebrew press that he would definitely not change any status quo reality at the Temple Mount for fear of "igniting a religious war", unfortunately echoing the most extremists of Arabs, including Mahmoud Abbas and also what the Pope heard, as well as now, Ki-Moon.*

Be that as it may, what perturbed me about the NYTimes' story was this:

“Allowing extremist Israeli settlers to raid Al Aksa compound protected by the Israeli police is a further proof of the belligerent agenda of the extremist Israeli government,” the P.L.O. said in a statement, referring to Mr. Feiglin, who lives in a West Bank settlement. “Such actions are part of the Israeli goal to turn Jerusalem into an exclusive Jewish city.”

Writing this

  referring to Mr. Feiglin, who lives in a West Bank settlement. 

is being a bit devious for, as Ms. Ruderon knows, or should know, having done a previous story on the Temple Mount activism, at least half the Jewish visitors are not "settlers" and a significant element aren't even religious, like the students' group.

In other words, she is 'excusing' for that above PLO statement.  Instead, she could perhaps have noted that the renewed pro-Jewish rights advocacy is not solely a "settler" affair and that the PLO is seeking to disparage and slur the whole project by simplistically referring to all Jews involved as 'settlers". Or, perhaps, she could have informed her readers that since the PLO views any Israeli presence in Jerusalem across the former Green Line as one of "settlers", including the more than 200,000 Jews in the neighborhoods there, then by perforce Jews who enter the Temple Mount compound are to be defined as "settlers".

But, in leaving all that out, and her editors are also at fault, she is covering for the PLO and definitely not reporting in an objective comprehensive fashion and not presenting background or highlighting the violence initiated by Muslims.

That is being devious.


-_____________

*

From PM Netanyahu's Remarks at the Start of his Meeting today with UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon (Communicated by the Prime Minister's Media Adviser)

Prime Minister Netanyahu added regarding the violence on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem]:
"I’m committed, and Israel is committed, to maintaining the status quo exactly as it’s been for many decades.
What we’re seeing are Palestinian extremists who are instigating violence through incitement. The incitement is spread by false and baseless rumors that we are threatening the Muslim holy places.  Nothing could be further from the truth.
Israel scrupulously maintains the protection of the holy sites, the right of all religions to worship in their holy places, and will continue to do so, maintaining order, maintaining freedom of worship."

P.S.  Read Evelyn Gordon's oped.

^


Sunday, October 12, 2014

Who Was Anti-Partition in 1937?

Who spoke the following anti-two-state proposal in 1937:-

Pledges have been given on both sides. The pledge which all the world regarded with considerable attention, and which was mentioned by the Secretary of State in his speech, is undoubtedly the Balfour Declaration of policy put forward by the War Cabinet in the crisis of the Great War. It is a delusion to suppose that this was a mere act of crusading enthusiasm or quixotic philanthropy. On the contrary, it was a measure taken, as the right hon. Gentleman who led us in the crisis of the War knows, in the dire need of the War with the object of promoting the general victory of the Allies, for which we expected and received valuable and important assistance. We cannot brush that aside and start afresh as though it had never been given, and deal with this matter as if we had no obligations or responsibility. Therefore...I should have preferred the Government to have persevered in the old policy of persuading one side to concede and the other to forbear, and to carry forward that policy, hard and heavy though it may be, with all its inconveniences.

However, we are now presented with this magnificently written State document, the result of months of inquiry by men of very high character and ability, and we are bound to treat the Report of such a Commission with proper respect and consideration. All the same I must say that I could not vote for the Government Motion that we should approve now the principle of partition. I cannot do so because it seems to me it would be premature for the Government to ask the House to commit itself finally to this main principle. The principle cannot be judged fairly apart from the details by which it is expressed. Take the military aspect alone. The gravest anxieties arise about that. There are two sovereign States, one a rich and small State more crowded than Germany, with double the population to the kilometre of France, and then in the mountains in the surrounding regions, stretching up to Bagdad with the Assyrians and the desert tribes to the south, the whole of this great Arab area confronting this new Jewish State...We have not got before us at this moment any of the vital data upon which we should be able to commit ourselves finally to the principle of partition...Therefore, I feel great difficulty at this stage and at this moment in committing myself to the principle of partition, and if it were the only alternative I should have no choice but to vote against it.

...There are, I believe, signs on both sides that people are thinking that perhaps rather than this they might make some mutual concessions. They have heard of the judgment of Solomon, and how wise that was, in which a baby was held up in order to see which was the true mother. But if sufficient time had not been given for the true mother to proclaim herself by her feelings, I very much doubt whether that parable would have commended itself so much to subsequent generations...



Answer.


BTW -

_________ also met with the Revisionist Zionist leader Vladimir Jabotinsky (16 July), who urged opposition to partition on the grounds that a truncated state would be afflicted by Jewish demographic weakness within, vulnerability to conquest from without, and an inability to absorb the mass of Jewish refugees. ________ himself used similar arguments in his speech in the Commons opposing partition (21 July) and in an article in the Evening Standard (23 July), 

^

Alas, Another Letter to the NYTimes Not Published

Surprise but my letter hasn't been published:

Your Oct. 2 editorial suggests that Israel's Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s "present course is antagonizing everyone" and that the NYTimes finds it "hard to see why he thinks it is in Israel’s best interest."

A possible answer is that what is in Israel's best interests are the country's current and future security, its basic national goals, its negative experiences with Arab terror and anti-Zionism for over nine decades, the American administrations decided lack of forthrightness in confronting Iran's nuclear program, the continuing anti-Israel incitement of the Palestinian Authority, the failure of territorial withdrawal evidenced by the Hamas-ruled Gaza after the 2005 Disengagement, not to mention the world-wide rise of anti-Semitism, the liberal support for boycott as well as the current American administration's confrontational attitude or abrasive acts like the reported March 2010 snub at the White House.

^